Wild Atlantic Way

Stretching Ireland’s western seaboard, the Wild Atlantic Way is the longest defined coastal touring route in the world. Over 2,500km in length, you will discover warmth in the diverse landscape and visit the most spectacular places. There’s more to a Wild Atlantic Way road trip than watching the view unfold as you glance out the window.  When you’re yearning for an open road experience peppered with walks along far-flung headlands, visits to national wonders, and some of the most impressive historical structures to be found anywhere in Ireland, our flavour of tours will feed your soul as they are alive with literature, music, stories, beaches and surf, islands, its landscape, flora, fauna – unmissable.

The Atlantic surf has shaped everything from Connemara’s landscape to the spirit of Galway city.  Derryigimlagh – alluring landscapes. The stark and otherworldly blanket bog of Derrigimlagh, Connemara has an unusual claim to fame, for it was here that pilots Alcock and Brown crash-landed to safety after completing the world’s first transatlantic flight in 1919. The patchwork landscape of small lakes and peat bog will make you feel as though you’re in another world.

Cliffs of Moher –  out at the wild Atlantic from atop the towering Cliffs of Moher in County Clare is guaranteed to take your breath away. Head to the spectacular O’Brien’s Tower, and gaze out to sea towards the Aran Islands, or, if the conditions are right, keep your eyes peeled for thrill-seekers racing down the face of the elusive Aileen’s Wave.

The Burren means ‘the great rock’ and this moonscape of karst limestone is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Between the cracked limestone that stretches over 250km, you’ll find megalithic tombs older than Egypt’s pyramids as well as abundant flora and fauna.

The Dingle Way in Kerry is a circular route beginning and ending in the town of Tralee that takes in all of these wonderments along the route. Out on the very edge off the Dingle Peninsula in Kerry, lie the sleepy Blasket Islands. After many years of hardship and emigration, the last inhabitants of this unique island community finally packed up for the mainland in 1953, leaving behind the remains of a way of life full of courage and intrigue. Today, you can celebrate their story at the Blasket Centre and learn all about this lost civilisation. The UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Skelligs is comprised of two sandstone rocks cutting a striking silhouette as they rise steeply out of churning Atlantic Ocean. Just seven miles off Kerry’s Iveragh Peninsula, on a clear day they’re close enough to see from the shore, while at certain times of year you can take a boat out to visit them. As famous for their sacred 1,300-year-old pilgrimage site as they are for recently being featured in the recent Star Wars films.

Why Ireland?

Aran Islands & Cliffs of Moher

This tour allows you to visit both the Aran Islands and Cliffs of Moher in 1 day

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Connemara

Our Connemara tour takes in all the Connemara highlights of the Wild Atlantic Way.

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Cliffs of Moher Tour

This unique tour gives you 5 hours at the Cliffs of Moher to explore at your own pace

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